All posts in Maths

Who wants to be a millionaire?

Here’s a way to do it: Solve one of the seven Millennium Problems selected by the Clay Mathematics Institute of Cambridge, Mass., U.S. and you could earn $1 million.

P vs NP Problem
Riemann Hypothesis
Yang–Mills and Mass Gap
Navier–Stokes Equation
Hodge Conjecture
Poincaré Conjecture [Solved]
Birch and Swinnerton-Dyer Conjecture

Birch and Swinnerton-Dyer Conjecture

In mathematics, the Birch and Swinnerton-Dyer conjecture describes the set of rational solutions to equations defining an elliptic curve. It is an open problem in the field of number theory and is widely recognized as one of the most challenging mathematical problems. The conjecture was chosen as one of the seven Millennium Prize Problems listed by the Clay Mathematics Institute, which has offered a $1,000,000 prize for the first correct proof. It is named after mathematicians Bryan Birch and Peter Swinnerton-Dyer who developed the conjecture during the first half of the 1960s with the help of machine computation. As of 2017, only special cases of the conjecture have been proved.

Poincaré Conjecture

In 2002, Perelman proved the Poincaré Conjecture, which had stumped mathematicians since 1904. However, Perelman refused to accept the Fields Medal, the highest honor in mathematics, for the proof. He was the first and, thus far, only person to turn down the award. Four years later, he turned down the awarding of the first Clay Millennium Prize, as well as the accompanying $1 million.

Hodge Conjecture

In mathematics, the Hodge conjecture is a major unsolved problem in the field of algebraic geometry that relates the algebraic topology of a non-singular complex algebraic variety to its subvarieties. More specifically, the conjecture states that certain de Rham cohomology classes are algebraic, that is, they are sums of Poincaré duals of the homology classes of subvarieties.

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Navier-Stokes equation

Navier-Stokes equation, in fluid mechanics, a partial differential equation that describes the flow of incompressible fluids. The equation is a generalization of the equation devised by Swiss mathematician Leonhard Euler in the 18th century to describe the flow of incompressible and frictionless fluids. In 1821 French engineer Claude-Louis Navier introduced the element of viscosity (friction) for the more realistic and vastly more difficult problem of viscous fluids. Throughout the middle of the 19th century, British physicist and mathematician Sir George Gabriel Stokes improved on this work, though complete solutions were obtained only for the case of simple two-dimensional flows. The complex vortices and turbulence, or chaos, that occur in three-dimensional fluid (including gas) flows as velocities increase have proven intractable to any but approximate numerical analysis methods.

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Yang–Mills and Mass Gap

Yang and Mills introduced a remarkable new framework to describe elementary particles using structures that also occur in geometry. Quantum Yang-Mills theory is now the foundation of most of elementary particle theory, and its predictions have been tested at many experimental laboratories, but its mathematical foundation is still unclear.

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Riemann Hypothesis

The prime number theorem determines the average distribution of the primes. The Riemann hypothesis tells us about the deviation from the average. Formulated in Riemann’s 1859 paper, it asserts that all the ‘non-obvious’ zeros of the zeta function are complex numbers with real part 1/2.

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P vs NP Problem

The P versus NP problem is a major unsolved problem in computer science. It asks whether every problem whose solution can be quickly verified (technically, verified in polynomial time) can also be solved quickly (again, in polynomial time).

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